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Supporting your employees during the Russia-Ukraine crisis

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is having ripple effects around the world. In times of turmoil, employers need to address the impact that events can have on their workers, even those far from the center of conflict.

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Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is having ripple effects around the world. In times of turmoil, employers need to address the impact that events can have on their workers, even those far from the center of conflict.

This crisis will be most traumatic for employees in Ukraine or the wider region, and for those employees with family and friends located there, but many are feeling shocked, saddened, and anxious about what may lie ahead.

That this tragedy is unfolding on the heels of a global pandemic is amplifying feelings of uncertainty. But as we learned during the pandemic, there is much that employers can do to help employees weather a crisis, with empathy and meaningful support.

Your actions during the Russia-Ukraine conflict will likely have a long-lasting impact on your people and the resilience of your own business. Employees will remember how their employer supported or didn’t support them in this and other periods of crisis.

So what can organizations do now to manage with empathy?

  • The safety and security of employees should be the number one priority. Employers with operations in Ukraine and neighboring areas have the most pressing challenges: they may have employees who are fleeing, sheltering, or involved in combat. Consider how you can assist with basic needs including food, transportation, communications, healthcare, cash, and legal assistance. And you may want to let all employees know what steps you are taking to help those directly affected by the war to help ease the sense of powerlessness many are feeling.
  • Open the dialogue. Even if you don’t have operations in the region, don’t assume that the attack on Ukraine doesn’t directly impact any of your employees — it very well may. It’s important to address the situation and open up the dialogue. Remind employees how to contact the Employee Assistance Program and tap into other mental health resources. While blast company communications have an important role, managers are the key communicators in this situation — make sure they are prepared and have resources to support employees.
  • Offer ways to help. It's natural to be distressed by what we're seeing, and many people are wondering what they can do to alleviate the suffering of those directly affected. Helping others has been proven to improve mental health and well-being and there are countless ways to help with the crisis in Ukraine. Provide a list of credible charities and organizations that are accepting donations and consider matching your employees’ donations.

While the impact of this crisis will be experienced differently by each employee, employers can make a meaningful difference. Let employees know what you are doing to support the people of Ukraine, even if you don’t have operations there. Beyond that, flexibility, supportive leadership, and thoughtful communications can help those affected directly and indirectly know that you care.

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